[LIVE EVENT] Plug & Play Indoor Air Quality Monitoring

You’re invited to join our exclusive live event! Discover plug & play indoor air quality monitoring in the Alliot powered by myDevices live event with Synetica.

Air quality has become increasingly important in areas such as schools, offices, buildings and other high-risk environments. Join us on 22nd February at 4 pm GMT | 8 am PT to discover how our plug & play solutions enable you to monitor and report on the critical air quality parameters such as temperature, humidity, particulate matters and VOCs.

Throughout this interactive session we’ll be taking a look at Synetica‘s Enlink indoor and outdoor air quality sensors and how you can quickly deploy commercial solutions with Alliot powered by myDevices.

You’ll see first-hand popular use case applications across various industries and get a feel for the powerful myDevices platform through a live demo. You won’t want to miss it!

Can’t wait? Get in touch to discuss your indoor air quality monitoring requirements today.

How to Integrate Kerlink Wanesy Management Centre with Microsoft Azure

The sensor data received on the Kerlink Wanesy Management Centre doesn’t have to be stored only there. It is possible to integrate various dashboards or other cloud servers such as Microsoft Azure with Wanesy by setting up the HTTP push.

In this blog post, I will guide you through the steps you need to take to integrate Kerlink’s Wanesy Management Centre with Microsoft Azure.

Setting up Microsoft Azure

The first step for integrating your data is to create an account on Microsoft Azure. You can do this for free by visiting the Microsoft Azure website: Create Your Azure Free Account Today | Microsoft Azure.

There are various Pricing Plans to choose from. Some features may be limited in the free variant. The account, however, is free to create and features are paid on a pay-as-you-use basis.

Once the account is created, we will need to use the IoT Central Application and the IoT Hub platform. The IoT Central Application can display data on the dashboard as well as integrate the device templates. The IoT Hub platform is used to adapt the WMC push to Azure.

Setting up the Azure IoT Central Application

In the search bar type ‘IoT Central Applications’ and hit search. You could also click on the icon if shown on the main page.

Then click on the Create button and fill in the boxes as in the picture below.

Creating the IoT Central Application

If the Resource group tab is empty, click Create new and type in a new name.

At this stage the URL is chosen, by default, it is the name of the resource .azureiotcentral.com but you can adjust it accordingly.

Once all the information is inserted, click on the Create button and give it a few minutes to deploy your application.

When you have a “Your deployment is complete” message, you can move forward to the next step.

Connecting Your Devices

Go to your IoT Central Application– the quickest way is to go to the URL chosen in the previous step.
In my example that will be kerlink-demo.azureiotcentral.com

Once you are in your dashboard, go to the Administration section and go to ‘Device Connection’. Find and copy Scope ID. Go to the IoT devices group type and copy the Primary Key. Save it in a text file as it will be required at a later stage.

Finding Scope ID and Keys
Copying Scope ID and keys

Now, go to the following link to create your custom template. https://portal.azure.com/#create/Microsoft.Template/uri/https%3A%2F%2Fraw.githubusercontent.com%2FBenoitDuffez%2Fiotc-device-bridge%2Fmaster%2Fazuredeploy.json<

Choose ‘Kerlink Resource Group’ and paste the Scope ID here as well as the Primary Key. Paste the Primary Key in the “IoT Central SAS Key” box.

Creating a custom deployment

Click Next: Review + create. Review the options and click Create.

Wait a minute until the Deployment is done and when you have the message saying “Your deployment is complete” you can move on to the next steps.

Adding Your Devices to Kerlink WMC

Now is a great time for you to add your devices to the Wanesy Management Center. You can skip this step if you have devices already added. Just remember to create a new push configuration later and assign it to the existing cluster.

First of all, login to WMC, go to the Administration section, then select Clusters. In the bottom right corner click the plus icon and create a new cluster. A pop up window till open, in here you will need to give it a name and disable Push configuration. (later on, once we have the push configuration made, we will need to enable this).

Click Validate. Once you have done this, go to the Administration section and ‘End Devices’ tab. Click on the plus icon in the bottom right and fill in all the information. Follow instructions until you can click Validate. When you click Validate the device will be added to the WMC.

Setting up the Push URL

Go back to Microsoft Azure and go toIoT Central applications, click on the Kerlink resource group and click on the function app which has a thunder icon.

Once that is open, go to the Functions section on the left-hand side menu and click on Functions. Click on the function that triggers the HTTP event and select the Code + Test tab. Give it a minute to load and from the tabs on the top of the screen select Get function URL.

Getting the function URL

In the pop-up window leave the key as default and copy the URL.

Copying the URL

Now go to Kerlink Wanesy and click on the Administration section and Clusters tab. On top of the screen select Push Configurations and then click the plus icon in the bottom right.

In the pop-up window, type the name, select HTTP type and Payload message detail level. Click next.

On the next screen paste the URL from Azure. You need to cut the URL from its end up to the question mark symbol (including the ?). You will then need to pastethis into the Data Up route box.

For example:

This is my example link from Azure:
https://iotc-fnp7rbonitg2tyg.azurewebsites.net/api/IoTCIntegration?code=gykWSte3vai5YEaECLlm5PGuMm0fb7RWE9I10m6TLFqTWxVhmfVJCQ==

In the URL box should be this part:
https://iotc-fnp7rbonitg2tyg.azurewebsites.net/api/IoTCIntegration

And in the Data Up route the rest, that is:
?code=gykWSte3vai5YEaECLlm5PGuMm0fb7RWE9I10m6TLFqTWxVhmfVJCQ==

WMC Push Config URL

Then click Next, don’t choose any SSLs, click Next again, and click Validate without creating any custom headers.

Now go to the Clusters tab on the top of the screen. Find the cluster you have created previously (or find the cluster that you have the sensors in) and click on the pencil icon next to it to edit.

In the pop-up window under the ‘Push’ section, click Enable and from the drop-down list select the Push configuration that you’ve just created. Press Validate.

Once that is done, uplink messages will start being pushed to Azure from the next time the sensor sends the uplink.

Creating the Device and Device Template on Azure

In MS Azure go to your IoT Central Application. The easiest way to get there is to go via the URL created at the beginning – the name of the resource .azureiotcentral.com
In my case it is kerlink-demo.azureiotcentral.com.

You can start with creating a device. Click on Devices and then New. Type the name and Device ID. You can use any name and any ID, for demo purposes I’ve selected the name of the sensor as the name and its DevEui as the ID. You can leave the Template as unassigned at this stage. Then click Create.

Once you create a device, it will have a “registered” status. After it starts sending data, the status will change from “registered” to “provisioned”.

You can then go into the device screen and in the Raw data screen, you should see uplink messages. Go to the Manage template tab at the top of the screen and select the Auto-create template option. Then click on Create template button.

Once you go back to the devices tab and click the row with a message, you will see more detailed pieces of information for each message.

It is worth mentioning here, the number of messages you can see on Azure depends on the plan you’ve selected earlier. Free plans limit the number of messages quite drastically. If you exceed the number of messages they will just stop appearing in the Azure.

If you have a device sending the uplink every few minutes, you will most likely exceed the limit in no time.

“How To” video

To summarise this article up to this point you can watch the above video.

Further Steps

Further steps to use the decoder and fully decode the data will be researched soon. The way to do it is by creating the IoT Hub in Azure and registering the device there along with linking the decoder to it. The further steps of how to do it are currently under development.

To speak with a member of our team about integrating Kerlink Wanesy with your chosen cloud server call us on 01484 599544 or contact us.

Choosing The Correct IoT Solar Panel For Your Application

Selecting the bet IoT Solar Panel

The sunlight is a great source of power, and it can be used to charge various kinds of batteries. Parametric offers a solution that uses solar panels to charge batteries in their People and Traffic Counters. However, while the solution works great, it is important to remember that the choice of the IoT Solar panel in the right size matters.

The main criterium that determines if the solar solution will even be possible is the place of use. Additionally, things like fog, dust and even cloudy weather may affect the performance of the IoT solar panel system.

Parametric has in their portfolio a wide range of products suitable for various use cases. They have a range of solar panels with integrated charges and batteries for solar panels from 5V up to 20V.

As mentioned before, it is critical to properly select the correct solar solution. This article may help with that choice a little.

PVGIS – Photovoltaic Geographical Information System

The PVGIS is a great tool that can be used for the simulation of the solar power system. It uses meteorological data at the desired location. This is a free online tool and can be accessed at the link below.

JRC Photovoltaic Geographical Information System (PVGIS) – European Commission (europa.eu)

Simulation

The first step for the simulation is to type the address or select the desired place by clicking on the map. Once the place is selected, you need to enter the technical data of the solar panel.

Choosing the location of the solar panel.

Go to the Off-Grid tab and type the correct details of the solar system. For example, parametric offers the 17W solar panel with a 40° mounting bracket. In this case, settings should look like this:

Entering details of the solar system

Parameters and values

Parameters and Values explanation.

Once all values are entered, it is time to run the simulation. Click on the Visualise results button.

The 1st visualisation

The most important output from the simulation is the Percentage days with empty battery.

In this example, at the chosen location, the value is 1.8%.

If the value is 0, there is a very good chance the solar powered system will work in the desired place. If it is not, like in this case, a more powerful system should be chosen.

To simulate if the solution would work with the bigger IoT solar panel in this location, we need to go back to the table with details of the solar system and change the Peak power to a higher value. Let’s try a 60W panel instead of 17W.

Adjusting the solar panel power.

And simulate the results again…

The 2nd visualisation

Now, the value of percentage days with an empty battery is 0, which means the 60W solar system should work fine for this location.

Disclaimer

The PVGIS simulation is based on a meteorological data model (PVGIS-NSRDB solar radiation database). There can always be unpredictable weather situations where too little solar energy is stored and the system will switch off. Alliot nor Parametric can be responsible for any miscalculations or mis-purchases that may result from using this tool.

Contact us today for assistance in assessing your IoT Solar Panel requirements or to discuss your IoT projects in more detail.

Take Remote Control with NKE’s LoRaWAN Smart Plug

Remote Control Plug

We’ve had lots of requests for a UK variant of a LoRaWAN® Smart Plug. Up until now, these have been hard to come by… make way for the new NKE UK LoRaWAN® Smart Plug! Now it’s here, we’d like to share some of the key features and benefits of this hotly anticipated LoRaWAN® sensor with you.

What is the NKE Smart Plug?

Typically speaking, a Smart Plug is a small adapter that is plugged into a regular electrical wall outlet. Smart Plugs enable you to remotely control connected devices or appliances.

The NKE Smart Plug connects to a public or private LoRaWAN® network to enable you to remotely control connected devices. It also monitors power consumption and power quality measurements such as average/min/max voltage (rms/peak) and frequency.

Uses of Remote Control Plugs

There are many uses for remote control plugs. The NKE Smart Plug is CE certified and is ideal for both domestic and commercial environments. Some example use cases include:

  • Remotely manage the operation of common household electrical appliances
  • Identify areas for improving energy efficiencies
  • Reduce carbon footprints in large office environments by identifying and remotely controlling equipment which may be left running
  • Save money on energy bills in empty premises where appliances may still be connected to power
  • Remotely schedule the hours you want devices to be connected to power with remote power scheduling

We work closely with our partners to help you access the products you need. Our close working relationships with some of the world’s leading manufacturers enable us to help you source and develop the products you require. If there’s something missing from your project contact our expert team to find out how we can help.

Alliot Video – LoRaWAN Sensor types

The second part to our educational video series is now live, giving you a glimpse into what is possible with LoRaWAN sensor types and the things that can be done with them.

At Alliot we strive to bring you the very best in IoT LoRaWAN sensors to give you the options to build you perfect solution. All of our team members  have expert knowledge on all our stocked devices through advanced and rigorous testing. With Alliot you can rest assured know that your devices will work with whatever it is you have planned.Our team are available to answer any query you may have about these devices as well as suggest the best products for your project.

Video Transcript – LoRaWAN Sensor Types

LoRaWAN Sensors and what can be done with them

LoRaWAN sensors come in many shapes, sizes and functionality.

Whether you’re looking to monitor air quality, vibration, energy, water flow, soil moisture or even track your assets and livestock. Alliot has the LoRaWAN sensor for you.

The possibilities LoRaWAN sensors present is virtually endless. Using LoRaWAN, sensors can be configured to send recorded data at specific intervals to your LoRaWAN network. Enabling you to monitor and analyse your environment to better improve your efficiencies and productivity.

So what are some of the things you can do with LoRaWAN sensors?

How about tracking the many assets in your warehouse? Such as a forklift, that Dave has left at the back of the warehouse again or maybe?

Amara accidentally left the heating on over the weekend and its costing the company money?

Or how about so Farmer Ted knows when his crops need more water or even more fertilizer.

Maybe even the local council who would like to monitor traffic through the city centre.

LoRaWAN sensors are able to monitor all of these and more, providing you with informative data which you can act on.

Sitting on their own network, LoRaWAN sensors can be quickly installed with little disruption your existing infrastructure – saving you time and money. We can even provision them for you so they’re ready to install straight out of the box!

LoRaWAN sensors have many uses and can help solve all kinds of challenges you might face day to day within your business. Contact our expert team today to find out more about our range of LoRaWAN sensors and beginning your IoT journey.

I hope you found this video informative, please like and subscribe to our channel to stay up to date with all our future videos.

 

Can IoT healthcare devices help in a pandemic?

As the NHS battle to save thousands of lives across the country, we’re looking to how technology could help. Could IoT healthcare devices be the future of patient care? This blog post looks at some of the LoRaWAN devices available, and how they could benefit the NHS.

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic we’ve seen technology take centre stage as we try to continue life as normal. From online PE lessons for kids who aren’t at school, to Zoom conversations with family members; we’re all using the internet more than ever.

LoRaWAN sensors don’t use wifi (so you can save your bandwidth for your video calls and streaming). They use a completely different network. They also use very little data, and very little power. These devices are also relatively affordable.

iot healthcare lorawan medical devices

So how could we use them to develop an IoT healthcare strategy to help the NHS?

1. Emergency buttons for the elderly and vulnerable

COVID-19 has very serious health implications for over 70s and those with existing health conditions. Many of our most vulnerable members of society have been asked to self-isolate for up to 12 weeks.

But how do we check on them? What if they’re unable to get to a phone? Providing those at home with an emergency button that they could push if they needed urgent care could potentially save lives. LoRaWAN technology means that these devices could have a battery life of up to 5 years (based on transmitting data every hour).

2. Asset tracking for medical equipment

One of the biggest issues with the COVID-19 crisis has been lack of ventilators. Manufacturers around the world are scrambling together to produce enough ventilators and respirators to enable our doctors and nurses to care for their patients.

Ventilation equipment is very expensive (£120 per mask and £4,000 per machine, according to 2016 figures from Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust). Keeping track of all of these machines using GPS would allow the NHS to find out whether there are unused ventilators available across the country. LoRaWAN asset trackers could also be used to alert staff when a ventilator machine is removed from hospital premises.

3. Parking sensors for ambulance bays

Parking sensors have been developed for smart cities. The sensors detect whether or not a parking space is occupied.

The same technology could be used in an IoT healthcare setting by identifying empty ambulance bays. You could then direct ambulances to the nearest available bay. This could have a huge impact on time-critical emergencies, helping to save lives.

4. Desk sensors adapted for hospital beds

Lack of available beds is an ongoing issue for the NHS. During the COVID-19 pandemic we’ve seen thousands of extra beds provided in emergency hospitals. Having a better picture of where beds are available could help many hospital departments.

Desk sensors have been developed to monitor desk occupancy in a commercial environment. They measure motion, temperature, light and humidity. But they also have a thermopile sensor that can detect body heat. Perfect for patients who aren’t able to move around.

5. Temperature sensors for medical storage

Some medications need to be stored at specific temperatures. Installing temperature sensors in fridges and freezers can alert staff to any changes in temperature. If a fridge door is left open accidentally, an alert will be triggered when the inside of the fridge goes outside the normal temperature range. This could prevent vital supplies from being spoiled, and ensure medication is kept under the right conditions.

There are hundreds of ways that technology can be used for IoT healthcare applications. LoRaWAN technology is so versatile thanks to it’s long battery life, affordability and low data usage. If you’d like more information on how we could help you to develop IoT healthcare solutions, get in touch with our technical team.